Food for thought...

Kevin, Casa's head-chef sent me an email depicting lots of Chinese delicacies, including Lizards Tails, Dog Brain Soup, Scorpion Brochettes, etc...
I have total respect for people's (weird) tastes. After all, I like olives smothered with chili, roast beef dripping with blood, whole ungutted fish, so who am I to talk?
I hear that down in the deepest confines of the Algerian Sahara, deep-fried crickets are absolutely delicious. I have never tasted them but being open-minded I'd give them a try as long as there is a bottle of Tabasco nearby.

But I definitely draw the line at Seahorses...
I don't think I've ever seen a live one, but just do check out Finding Nemo... The Seahorses look so pretty and lovable...
I can't imagine them skewered, let alone barbequed.

Where do you draw the line?


17 comments:

Sheffy said...

I agree there are foods that are acceptable in some cultures and not others. We used to eat blackbirds in this country for instance! I draw the line at lots of things mostly of the fishy and scaley variety!
I like to stay in my comfort zone!

Trac said...

I think I would try almost anything if I was in the right place at the right time.

But NOT seahorses, because they are one of my favourite creatures.

Nor will I eat
Dog

Tortoise

Monkey

or
Human.

Unless it was a matter of life or death...

Trac said...

p.s. I agree about beef.

Krimo said...

I agree with you, Sheffy and welcome.
Just like Trac, I am not averse to anything and under the right circumstances, i.e. in a foreign country, I'd try any food the locals eat. Then I will make up my mind.
But I still draw the line at seahorses, they're so cute!

PS: I think I've tried monkey in a night market in Abidjan (Ivory Coast)... I say I think, because it was too dark to tell.:O)

Zéphyr, said...

Cela rappelle le film "Mondo Cane" (Monde de chien). Effectivement, la cuisine asiatique nous semble étrangement bizarre. Les habitudes alimentaires diffèrent, respectons-les.

C'est comme au Sahara, les criquets sont grillés ; il paraît que cela a le goût des crevettes.

L'hippocampe, cheval de mer, c'est les armoiries d'une petite ville côtière à l'ouest d'Alger. Inimaginable dans la cuisine.

Zéphyr, said...

La photo peut être classée dans la série insolite ; dans un restaurant chinois ou vietnamien, à la rigueur, mais pas dans un restaurant symbolisant la richesse européenne et méditerranéenne.

Sheffy said...

But, if you say you draw the line at sea horses because they are cute, what about lamb?

Krimo said...

Je savais qu'on mangeait les criquets au Sahara. Je ne les ai jamais goutés...
La photo vient d'un marché ambulant en Chine.

Sheffy, you got me there! I love lamb both dead and alive.

LDahl said...

Nope, not seahorses! I think many of them are endangered and I can't see that there would be much to eat on one anyway. Have a nice rattlesnake instead!:)))) Just kidding.

Crabtree said...

Peut être que comme la corne de rhinocéros sert à traiter l'impuissance ? L'hippocampe rendra l'homme chinois fécond ( en un mot !)

Krimo said...

L, rattlesnakes? Now, what would you serve them with? With a shake or a roll?

Crabtree, en un mot, nos amis les Chinois n'ont besoin de rien pour être féconds. Combien sont-ils déjà?
Dans d'autres pays, le taux de fécondité est un petit peu plus difficile à calculer... (Open in a new window.)

Akelamalu said...

I'm quite conservative in my tastes, some would say boring, but I have a sensitive gag reflex. :(

Krimo said...

I won't tell you any gags then, Akela...:(

PI said...

Eye balls and balls in general.

Krimo said...

Pi, you're hilarious!
Love it!

Crabtree said...

"difficile à calculer"

La jeunesse nous réserve des surprises !
vont ils nous pondrent des hippocampes ?

Zéphyr, said...

Mesdames, Mesdemoiselles, Messieurs ! N'oublions pas, la civilisation chinoise a contribué énormément au patrimoine universel.